Sun, Sep 13 | Zoom

Sephardi Cooking Demonstration and Conversation with Judy Jackson

You are invited to be in conversation with and view a food demonstration with novelist, food writer, and chef Judy Jackson, from London England.
Registration is Closed
Sephardi Cooking Demonstration and Conversation with Judy Jackson

Time & Location

Sep 13, 2020, 10:00 AM – 11:15 AM
Zoom

About the Event

As part of your preparation for Rosh Hashanah please join Core Connects RI for a lovely program on Sunday September 13th at 10 am.

You are invited to be in conversation with and view a food demonstration with novelist, food writer, and chef Judy Jackson, from London England.

So exciting!

Judy is so accomplished that she is hard to describe. She has a You Tube channel where she has a series of videos about cooking for adults and children, plus a few about cookery books and writers. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCo6kFrc1H6heHRebyDU5hvA

She has published seven cookbooks, two novels and has written for many major British newspapers.

Judy has a food blog called THE ARMCHAIR KITCHEN http://thearmchairkitchen.com/

Her latest book is her memoir EPISODES, two girls, two lives, one time.  https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07PPBDW1R/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vapi_tkin_p1_i0

Judy feels that one’s early life - specially with regard to food - has an impact on one’s thoughts, behavior and cooking, decades later.

Judy will speak to us about Portuguese and Spanish Festival food and will show us how to make an unusual Sephardi dessert called Fijuelas.

FIJUELAS - A PORTUGUESE SEPHARDI DESSERT

Fijuelas are also made in Morocco and Gibraltar, where they are called fazuelas. Similar pastries from Djerba, Tunisia are called Deblas. Fijuelas are crisp, fried pastry coils, soaked in a sweet syrup. They were traditionally served at Rosh Hashanah or eaten after the Fast of Yom Kippur. Some people make them for Purim. The truth is they are unusual and very festive.

Sephardi cooking  "Is sensual, aromatic and colorful. It makes use of anything that gives flavor - seeds, bits of bark, resins, pods, petals, and flower waters. The Sephardim had a sunny, hedonistic nature. They were less concerned with the inner, spiritual life than the Ashkenazim, more sensitive to beauty and pleasure; and good eating has always been part of their traditional life. Their cooking is of a kind that lifts the spirits. The warm and sunny world they lived in had something to do with this, as had their way of life and historical experience.

( Claudia Roden) .

Whereas Ashkenazi cooking on the whole was the cooking of a  people closed in on itself with little contact with the non-Jewish population and the outside world, Sephardi cooking developed in communities whose people had an intimate contact with and were deeply influenced by the world they lived in."

Save the date and join us for this fascinating and delightful program that you won't want to miss.

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